Services

Services

DC Power Evaluation

This is a free service which Telcom Marketing, Ltd. provides to make sure that you have the adequate power to meet your critical back up power needs. Our trained technical services will take a look at your battery, rectifiers, inverters, cable sizing and grounding.
We will provide this evaluation at no cost to you and provide pricing for any needed upgrades or repairs that we find.
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Battery Testing

We will do a low cost or potentially no cost analysis of your battery plant (depending on the size and the location of the plant). We will gather any vital documentation for any warranty service that may be required.
We may recommend further testing using our trained technicians from Power Product Services. This kind of testing will give you an exact understanding of how well your battery will be able to perform when you are required to go on standby power.
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Service & Installation

Our partner Power Product Services will provide a complete turn-key solution to get your critical backup system working in a timely seamless manner. We will get your product to your site, handle the heavy products and dispose of the spent batteries.
Battery maintenance is very critical to your backup system. Your batteries and power system
need to be taken care of so that you know you can depend on it when the commercial power goes down.
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Battery Recycling

Recycling is a big part of the beneficial use and responsible handling of lead and products made from it. Exide Technologies invests in battery recycling because it’s good for business and for the environment.

In fiscal year 2010, Exide Technologies recycled sufficient lead tonnage to make the Company one of the largest secondary lead recyclers in the world.

Exide also is a significant recycler of plastic, capturing the plastic from spent batteries and using it in the production of cases and covers for new batteries. Recycling not only protects the environment, but also saves energy and money on raw materials.

In the recycling process, spent—or dead—batteries are broken apart, and the lead, plastic and acid are separated. The lead is melted, poured into ingots and delivered to battery plants to be used in new batteries. The plastic is chipped, washed and delivered to a plastics plant, where it is melted and made into new battery cases and other parts.

The sulfuric can is reused on a limited basis or alternatively is neutralized and discharged.

Exide Technologies has a total of 10 recycling facilities: six in the U.S., three in Europe and one in New Zealand. All of them make Exide one of the few companies in the stored electrical energy industry with the capability to provide Total Battery Management [TBM] in its own facilities.

With TBM, there is no “womb to tomb” for lead-acid batteries, as there is for consumer products like computers and other products that aren’t recycled. Instead, Exide continuously cycles lead and plastic through the life—and afterlife—of batteries. The TBM infrastructure, consisting of battery manufacturing plants and recycling facilities combined with a sophisticated distribution network for new and spent batteries, allows Exide to manage the life cycle of its products before and after their service lives. Not many other industries are as proficient.

TBM produces benefits for customers, for Exide and for the environment. It frees customers from the regulatory burdens of handling lead and assures them of a continuous supply of batteries made from superior quality materials. It allows Exide Technologies to better manage its inventories for increased productivity at manufacturing sites. Finally, it keeps recyclable materials in the manufacturing stream instead of piling up in landfills. All of these benefits help Exide link directly to its mission to be respected worldwide as the leader in stored energy solutions and innovative technologies.

THE SECURITY OF EXPERIENCE – GOVERNMENT REGULATED
EXIDE has been in the battery business since 1888. Our progressive efforts and “vertical integration” in the manufacture, marketing and distribution of new lead-acid batteries made from recycled materials and the safe collection and recycling of spent batteries have made EXIDE an industry leader. As a leader, we continually improve and refine the recycling process. Our technology and sales programs are among the best in the industry.
All U.S. EXIDE facilities undergo regular review and inspection by EPA and state environmental agencies. In addition, many large industrial waste generators and environmental contractors conduct on-site environmental audits and utilize our approved EXIDE facilities.
Our secondary lead recycling facilities located in Baton Rouge, LA, Forest City, MO, Frisco, TX, Muncie, IN, Reading, PA and Vernon, CA operate under RCRA Part B Hazardous Waste Facility Permits issued by U.S. EPA and corresponding state environmental regulatory agencies, or under approved interim status awaiting final issuance of such permits. These EPA permits are only given after a comprehensive review process with ongoing regulatory supervision designed to ensure compliance with regulations.

OUR INDUSTRY RUNS ON SPENT BATTERIES
As one of the world’s leading battery manufacturers, recycling is a natural fit for our company. The lead and plastic reclaimed from your spent batteries is used to make new EXIDE products. It’s a recycling loop that is part of our “vertical integration” process, and it keeps shelves stocked and the environment clean.
To promote the loop and keep the recycling chain moving, we encourage our customers and state legislatures to create programs ensuring a spent battery is returned each time a new battery is purchased. Forty three (43) U.S. states have adopted various mandatory battery recycling laws.
At EXIDE, we believe that recycling is an integral part in the success of our company. In 2001 alone, EXIDE recycled more than 33 million batteries, while producing more than 14 million new batteries using materials from our EXIDE recycling facilities. We’ve turned sales progress into environmental protection.

WHERE DO YOUR SPENT LEAD-ACID BATTERIES GO?
When EXIDE picks up your spent lead-acid batteries, they go to the recycling facilities where our process separates the lead, plastic, and acid. The lead is smelted and cast into lead-alloy bars which are shipped to one of our EXIDE plants to make new battery plates. The plastic is washed, granulated, and extruded into pellets which are bulk packed and shipped to the company that supplies cell jars and covers. EXIDE’s ability to recycle plastic at the secondary lead recycling facility is further assurance that all phases of the battery recycling process remain under our exacting control. The sulfuric acid is neutralized on site under regulatory permits or converted into sodium sulfate that is used in laundry detergent, glass and textile manufacturing.

EXIDE AND THE EPA WORKING TOGETHER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT
Government regulations on the control of hazardous substances are established to protect us and our environment now and in the future. In coordination with the EPA, EXIDE has participated in the reclamation of materials from Superfund sites in Georgia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and others. EXIDE has also worked with various U.S. State and Federal regulatory agencies to study the feasibility of reclaiming lead from the paint in older homes, bridges, firing ranges, electronics, ships, etc. The more ways we discover to recycle lead, the less impact to our environment.
Responsibly Recycle Your Industrial Lead Acid Batteries
TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR ENVIRONMENT – RECYCLE WITH EXIDE AND BREATHE EASY.

EXIDE owns and operates secondary lead recycling facilities for the recycling of spent lead-acid batteries and other lead-bearing materials. When your batteries are returned to our facilities, they are recycled in compliance with federal land ban regulations and state recycling laws. Our facilities currently operate under RCRA Part B Hazardous Waste Facility permits issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and corresponding state environmental regulatory agencies, or under approved interim status awaiting final issue of such permits.
Lead-acid batteries received at EXIDE’s recycling facilities are shredded or otherwise disassembled, and the lead, casing and acid fractions are separated. Under regulatory permits, the sulfuric acid is neutralized on site or converted into sodium sulfate that is used in laundry detergent, glass and textile manufacturing. Shredded polypropylene battery casings are washed, sized, classified and extruded to form polypropylene pellets used to manufacture new battery cases. The lead is recovered in furnaces and reused for the manufacture of lead-acid batteries or as a raw material in other processes. EXIDE’s “vertically integrated” operations are designed to provide the best possible management option for recycling of your spent batteries.
Only an industry leader can assure you that your spent lead-acid batteries have been correctly recycled. EXIDE is a high-profile corporation with accessibility worldwide.
Headquartered in Milton, GA, EXIDE has more than 65 branch locations servicing all 50 U.S. States.
EXIDE is committed to making sure your lead recycling needs are met today in order to help preserve nature for generations to come.
OUR U.S. RECYCLING FACILITIES
Reading, PA
Muncie, IN
Baton Rouge, LA
Forest City, MO
Vernon, CA
Frisco, TX
TO RECYCLE YOUR INDUSTRIAL BATTERIES, CALL:
1-800-424-1925
1-800-638-9890
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Compliance

Does your battery room require hydrogen detection, emergency power off switches, temperature compensation, spill containment or eyewash. Make sure that your battery room is compliant with local, state and federal regulations. TML will do the leg work to advise you of rules and what you need to do make sure that you are compliant with the most current regulations.

Codes and Regulations
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1, National Fire Prevention Code 2003(Proposed and in the adoption process)

Chapter 35 Stationary Lead-Acid Battery Systems
35-1 Scope: Stationary lead-acid battery systems having an electrolyte capacity of more than 100 gallons (378.5L) in sprinklered buildings or 50 gallons (189.3L) in unsprinklered buildings used for facility standby power, emergency power or uninterrupted power supplies shall be in accordance with Chapter 35.
35-2 Permits
35-2.1 General. Permits, where required shall comply with section 1-16.
35-2.2 Design Submittals. Prior to installation, plans shall be submitted and approved.
35-3 Installation and maintenance. Installation and maintenance of battery systems shall be accordance with ANSI/IEEE 484 Recommended Practice for Installations of Large-Lead Storage for Generating Stations and Substations and ANSI/IEEE Recommended Practice for Installation Maintenance of Lead-Acid Batteries.
35-3.2 Safety Venting. Batteries shall be provided with safety venting caps.
35-3.3 Occupancy Separation. In other than A,E,I and R Occupancies, battery systems shall be located in a room separated from other portions of the building by a minimum one-hour-resistive occupancy separation. In A,E,I and R Occupancies, battery systems shall be located in a room separated from other portions of the building by a two-hour-fire-resistive occupancy separation.
35-3.4 Spill Control. Each rack of batteries, or group of racks shall be provided with a liquid tight 4-inch spill-control barrier, which extends at least 1 inch beyond the battery rack in all directions.
35-3.5 Neutralization. An approved method to neutralize spilled electrolyte shall be provided. The method shall be capable of neutralizing a spill from the largest lead-acid battery to a pH between 7.0 – 9.0.

Codes and Regulations
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1, National Fire Prevention Code 2003(Proposed and in the adoption process)
Chapter 35 Stationary Lead-Acid Battery Systems
35-1 Scope: Stationary lead-acid battery systems having an electrolyte capacity of more than 100 gallons (378.5L) in sprinklered buildings or 50 gallons (189.3L) in unsprinklered buildings used for facility standby power, emergency power or uninterrupted power supplies shall be in accordance with Chapter 35.
35-2 Permits
35-2.1 General. Permits, where required shall comply with section 1-16.
35-2.2 Design Submittals. Prior to installation, plans shall be submitted and approved.
35-3 Installation and maintenance. Installation and maintenance of battery systems shall be accordance with ANSI/IEEE 484 Recommended Practice for Installations of Large-Lead Storage for Generating Stations and Substations and ANSI/IEEE Recommended Practice for Installation Maintenance of Lead-Acid Batteries.
35-3.2 Safety Venting. Batteries shall be provided with safety venting caps.
35-3.3 Occupancy Separation. In other than A,E,I and R Occupancies, battery systems shall be located in a room separated from other portions of the building by a minimum one-hour-resistive occupancy separation. In A,E,I and R Occupancies, battery systems shall be located in a room separated from other portions of the building by a two-hour-fire-resistive occupancy separation.
35-3.4 Spill Control. Each rack of batteries, or group of racks shall be provided with a liquid tight 4-inch spill-control barrier, which extends at least 1 inch beyond the battery rack in all directions.
35-3.5 Neutralization. An approved method to neutralize spilled electrolyte shall be provided. The method shall be capable of neutralizing a spill from the largest lead-acid battery to a pH between 7.0 – 9.0.

35-3.6 Ventilation. Ventilation shall be provided in accordance with the Mechanical Code and the following: 1. The ventilation system shall be designed to limit the maximum concentration of hydrogen to 1.0% of the total volume of the room in accordance with nationally recognized standards, or 2. Continuous ventilation shall be provided at a rate of not less than 1 cubic foot per minute square foot (.51L/s per m 2) of floor area of the room.
35-3.7 Signs. Doors into rooms or buildings containing stationary lead-acid battery systems shall be provided with approved signs. The signs shall state that the room contains lead-acid battery systems, that the battery room contains energized electrical circuits and that the battery electrolyte solutions are corrosive liquids.
35-3.8 Seismic Protection. Battery systems shall be seismically braced in accordance with the building code.
35-3.9 Smoke Detection. An approved automatic smoke detection system shall be installed in such areas and supervised by an approved central proprietary or remote station service or local alarm which will give an audible signal at a constantly attended location.

Federal Codes
OSHA 1910.268 Telecommunications
1910.268(b)(2) Battery handling.
1910.268(b)(2)(i) Eye protection devices which provide side as well as frontal eye protection for employees shall be provided when measuring storage battery specific gravity or handling electrolyte, and the employer shall ensure that such devices are used by the employees. The employer shall also ensure that acid resistant gloves and aprons shall be worn for protection against spattering. Facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided unless the storage batteries are of the enclosed type and equipped with explosion proof vents, in which case sealed water rinse or neutralizing packs may be substituted for the quick drenching or flushing facilities. Employees assigned to work with storage batteries shall be instructed in emergency procedures such as dealing with accidental acid spills.
1910.268(b)(2)(ii) Electrolyte (acid or base, and distilled water) for battery cells shall be mixed in a well ventilated room. Acid or base shall be poured gradually, while stirring, into the water. Water shall never be poured into concentrated (greater than 75 percent) acid solutions. Electrolyte shall never be placed in metal containers nor stirred with metal objects.
1910.268(b)(2)(iii) When taking specific gravity readings, the open end of the hydrometer shall be covered with an acid resistant material while moving it from cell to cell to avoid splashing or throwing the electrolyte.
1910.268(b)(3) Employers must provide employees with readily accessible, adequate, and appropriate first aid supplies. A non-mandatory example of appropriate supplies is listed in Appendix A to 29 CFR 1910.151.
EPA Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 40 Title 40, Hazardous Waste and Materials
Part 264 Owners and Operators of Hazardous Materials Facilities
264.175 Containment. A base which is free of cracks or gaps and sufficiently impervious to contain leaks, spills until the material is detected and removed. The base must be sloped or otherwise designed to drain and remove liquids resulting from the leaks, spills unless the containers are elevated or otherwise protected from contact with accumulated liquids. Sufficient capacity to contain 10% of the volume of the containers or the volume of the largest container, whichever is greater. Spilled or leaked waste must be removed from the sump or collection area in a timely manner as necessary to prevent overflow of the collection system.

Federal Guidelines
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standard 1187-1996
5.1 (g) Provisions for neutralizing, containing and safely disposing of acid electrolyte in accordance with governmental regulations should be included.
Standard 484-1996
5.1(g) Portable or stationary water facilities should be provided for rinsing spilled electrolyte. Provisions for neutralizing, containing and safely disposing of acid electrolyte in accordance with governmental regulation should be included.
American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)
Standards for cleaning concrete and concrete masonry units are available:
D4258-83 Surface Cleaning Concrete for Coating
D4261-83(1993)e1 Surface Cleaning Concrete Unit Masonry for Coating

Applications

Testimonials

"Just spoke with the electrician regarding Kevin and Zach. In addition to how good the TML/PPS guys were to work with, he commented on how knowledgeable and how exacting and detailed they did their job. It has been noted and forwarded."